100% Renewable Energy

Credit: ESB Professional/Shutterstock

Burning oil, gas and coal has not only polluted our air, water and land for decades; now it’s changing our climate even faster than scientists predicted it would. We can have healthier communities and a livable future for kids growing up today, but to get there, we first need to transform the way we produce and consume energy.

That's why, alongside our national network, we’re calling on communities, colleges and universities, corporations and other businesses, and our state governments to commit to 100% renewable energy. 

It’s a big, bold goal, one that would make America a world leader in the race toward a cleaner, healthier future — and it’s a goal that’s 100% possible. 

 

Leading the way forward

Consider: Companies ranging from Apple, Google and Facebook to General Motors, Johnson & Johnson and Coca Cola have already committed to going 100% renewable. So have cities like Rochester, Minn., San Diego, Georgetown, Texas, St. Petersburg, Fla., Greensburg, Kan., and Burlington, Vt. And so have universities from Colorado State University to Cornell.

State governments in California and Massachusetts have introduced bills that would require their states to achieve 100% renewable electricity by 2045 and 2050, respectively.

The best part is, the more cities, colleges and companies that go renewable, the faster wind and solar prices keep falling throughout the country — making it even easier for more to achieve 100% renewable energy.

Credit: Giselle Turner

Going 100% renewable is 100% possible

Solar power has tripled in America in just the last two years — with a new home or business going solar every one and a half minutes. It took 40 years for us to get to 1 million solar installations in the U.S. in 2016. Now we’re on track to add another 1 million new solar installations in just two years.

In many states, wind power is now cheaper than gas or coal. Clean energy continues to grow quickly, with prices dropping lower than even the most optimistic industry predictions of just a few years ago.

But we can do more, and we must do more to stave off the worst effects of climate change. 

Credit: Deepwater Wind

We need to keep building momentum

Recent actions in Washington, D.C., have threatened to slow down and even reverse the progress we’ve made so far.

It’s time to stop letting some slow-moving politicians drag their feet.

It’s time to urge our communities, our colleges and universities, our corporations and businesses, and our state governments to step up and lead.

Join our call, and help your community go 100% renewable.

We need to build a movement. The more people who join our call for 100% renewable power, the more local, state and corporate leaders will step up and take action. And we need more campuses, more communities and more companies to commit to 100% renewable. It will make a difference now and get us on the right track for the future.   

Credit: Adam Perri

Why wait?

Once, we were told that the pollution that came from burning oil, gas and coal was the price we had to pay for progress. Those days are over — especially since we know that burning fossil fuels is changing our climate and leaving our children with an uncertain future.

Scientists say we must stop burning virtually all fossil fuels by 2050 in order to spare kids growing up today from the devastating impacts of climate change.

And why should we wait?

Why wait for healthier communities with cleaner air and water when we can have them today?

Why wait until it’s impossible to leave the kids we know and love a safer, healthier tomorrow?

Why wait, when we can start changing the conversation about how we produce and consume energy — so it’s no longer a question of whether we’ll get to 100% renewable power, but how fast?

Why wait, when America has the responsibility, the ingenuity and the will to start leading the world to a 100% renewable future right now?

Credit: Steven Gilbert

We’ve got the power

We’re ready for this. Our national network has done a lot to promote solar, wind and energy efficiency on the state and local levels. We’ve won clean energy policies, from pro-solar initiatives to clean cars programs to renewable energy standards in 22 states, all of which are driving down the costs of wind and solar, and reducing carbon pollution.

With renewable energy, we can have healthier communities right now and a more liveable future for kids growing up today. Together, we can do this. A 100% renewable future based on 100% American-made energy is 100% possible. And it starts now.  

Credit: Peter Kirkeskov Rasmussen via Flickr, CC BY-NC-SA 2.0

Issue updates

News Release | Environment America Research & Policy Group

Ten ways America’s cities can go solar

America’s cities and towns continue to be best positioned to lead the clean energy revolution. To aid their efforts, Environment America Research and Policy Center has released an updated toolkit, Ten Ways Your Community Can Go Solar, that offers practical ways for cities to take advantage of the millions of rooftops across the country and adopt more solar energy.

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Blog Post

We can’t keep running away from the environmental problems we face | Johanna Neumann

In January of this year, after working nearly 20 years with Environment America and our related organizations, I started a new role as our Senior Director for Campaigns for 100% Renewable Energy. In this capacity, I direct a team of talented advocates and organizers that work with our state offices and allies across the country to move America and the world toward a future powered entirely by clean renewable energy.

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LED there be light! | Ben Sonnega

Recently, I had lunch with a friend who is an energy consultant working on utility issues. As we got chatting, he mentioned that street lamps were among the biggest energy users in cities around the country. Even as someone who spends most of his day thinking about energy issues, that was surprising. When I think of energy efficiency and conservation, I have to admit street lamps aren’t at the top of my list of concerns. But after learning this interesting fact, I decided to do some research.

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News Release | Environment America Research & Policy Center

New campaign launched on campuses urges colleges and universities to shift to 100 percent clean renewable power

As students across the country begin a new semester, Environment America Research & Policy Center is launching a campaign on dozens of campuses, pressing colleges and universities to generate 100 percent of their energy from renewable sources. The initiative aims to get 150 schools to commit by 2021 to exclusively using renewable energy.

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What makes an environmental advocate? | Emma Searson

As part of my job, I interview a few candidates each week for Environment America’s year-long fellowship program. Generally speaking, I’m talking to college seniors, who are figuring out the very first step in their post-graduation careers. In those conversations, I invariably end up spending some time discussing why I do what I do. Last week, an interviewee asked point-blank how I first got my start in environmental advocacy, and I surprised myself by having to stop and think about it.

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