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Good as news: positive environmental stories you may have missed this week | Emma Searson

The Public Interest Network’s Environment America and U.S. PIRG are working on multiple campaigns to help America get through the coronavirus pandemic as quickly and safely as possible. But we're also working to ensure that when the outbreak ends, the United States’ policies and practices ensure a cleaner, safer, better world for all of us.

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There’s a lot that keeps us connected, even when we’re physically distant | Emma Searson

There’s no doubt that the last few weeks have been bizarre. The vast majority of us across the country are now home-bound, and we’re all doing our best to protect our neighbors and the many heroic healthcare, grocery store and other essential workers who are holding our society together through this crisis. That means doing our best to keep our distance (and sanity).

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News Release | Environment America

Statement: EPA decision on air quality standards ‘defies logic’

Ignoring recommendations from its own scientists, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) opted Tuesday not to strengthen standards on industrial soot emissions. Fine particulate matter smaller than 2.5 micrometers, referred to as PM 2.5, poses especially high health risks because it can be deposited deep in the lungs.

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News Release | Environment Virginia

Virginia commits to ramping up renewables, 100 percent clean electricity by 2045

Virginia has become the first southern state and the seventh in the U.S. to pass a law that commits to providing 100 percent carbon-free electricity to its citizens by mid-century.

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Visualizing the renewable energy movement | Johanna Neumann

One small side benefit of isolating from society in a home other than my own is that I’ve gotten access to a whole new set of bookshelves and, therefore, a whole new set of ideas. Scanning my sister and brother-in-law’s bookshelves, I recently came across Susan Schulten’s “A History of America in 100 Maps” and soon buried myself in historic images that told the story of our country. I learned that maps played a key role in military strategy (like the ones Gen. William Tecumseh Sherman used to plan his march through Georgia). Maps were used for planning logistics (like deciding where postal roads would be sited). Maps were also used to fundamentally change how America eats (like maps put together by early meat-industry leader Armour).

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