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Trading Mountaintops for Energy | Graham Marema

When I was seven, my dad took me on my first backpacking trip. My older brother had gone the year before, but this summer it was my turn. It was just me, my dad and our purple bandanas. We filled our backpacks with instant mashed potatoes and hot chocolate mix, then set out into the wilderness of the Cumberland Plateau in East Tennessee.

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California reverses course on common sense solar policy | Bronte Payne

Imagine a future powered completely with clean, renewable energy. Imagine everything about your daily routine, whether it’s turning on your coffee maker in the morning or driving to work in your electric car, powered by the solar panels on your roof and the batteries in your garage.

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Report | Environment America Research & Policy Group

Ten Ways Your Community Can Go Solar

This series of guides should serve as a toolkit for communities interested in leading the transition to clean, renewable energy. Each guide illustrates the importance of one of the following policy tools for advancing solar energy adoption, as well as guidelines, case studies and additional resources.

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News Release | Environment America Research & Policy Group

Ten ways America’s cities can go solar

America’s cities and towns continue to be best positioned to lead the clean energy revolution. To aid their efforts, Environment America Research and Policy Center has released an updated toolkit, Ten Ways Your Community Can Go Solar, that offers practical ways for cities to take advantage of the millions of rooftops across the country and adopt more solar energy.

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Report | Environment America Research & Policy Center

Destination: Zero Carbon

In the U.S., transportation is climate enemy number one. America’s transportation system produces more greenhouse gas emissions than any other sector of our economy and, on its own, is responsible for 4 percent of the world’s greenhouse gas emissions – more than the entire economies of France and the United Kingdom combined.

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