UPDATE: New energy-efficiency standards proposed for gas furnaces

Today, the Biden administration proposed to phase out the most inefficient gas furnaces. 

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Johanna Neumann
Senior Director, Campaign for 100% Renewable Energy

Author: Johanna Neumann

Senior Director, Campaign for 100% Renewable Energy

(413) 256-6434

On staff: 2001-2003; 2005-present
B.S., Tufts University

Johanna directs strategy and staff for Environment America's energy campaigns at the local, state and national level. In her prior positions, she led the campaign to ban smoking in all Maryland workplaces, helped stop the construction of a new nuclear reactor on the shores of the Chesapeake Bay and helped build the support necessary to pass the EmPOWER Maryland Act, which set a goal of reducing the state’s per capita electricity use by 15 percent. She also currently serves on the board of Community Action Works. Johanna lives in Amherst, Massachusetts, with her family, where she enjoys growing dahlias, biking and the occasional game of goaltimate.

Today, the Department of Energy proposed to phase out the most inefficient gas furnaces, triggering a 60 day public comment period. 

The Department of Energy estimates that the proposed efficiency standard for furnaces—potentially the first meaningful update in 35 years—would cut carbon emissions by 373 million metric tons and methane emissions by 5.1 million tons — the equivalent of what 61 million homes emit each year. The standard also would reduce emissions of nitrogen oxides, which cause asthma attacks, cardiovascular disease, and even premature death.

"Turning up the heat in our homes doesn't have to mean turning up levels of pollution," said Johanna Neumann, Senior Director of Environment America's Campaign for 100% Renewable Energy. "If these efficiency standards get approved, heating our homes will get a whole lot cleaner."

 

Johanna Neumann
Senior Director, Campaign for 100% Renewable Energy

Author: Johanna Neumann

Senior Director, Campaign for 100% Renewable Energy

(413) 256-6434

On staff: 2001-2003; 2005-present
B.S., Tufts University

Johanna directs strategy and staff for Environment America's energy campaigns at the local, state and national level. In her prior positions, she led the campaign to ban smoking in all Maryland workplaces, helped stop the construction of a new nuclear reactor on the shores of the Chesapeake Bay and helped build the support necessary to pass the EmPOWER Maryland Act, which set a goal of reducing the state’s per capita electricity use by 15 percent. She also currently serves on the board of Community Action Works. Johanna lives in Amherst, Massachusetts, with her family, where she enjoys growing dahlias, biking and the occasional game of goaltimate.