Environment America Research and Policy Center Latest Blog Posts

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John Rumpler
Senior Director, Clean Water for America Campaign and Senior Attorney

The Delaware River watershed is a vital source of clean water for drinking, wildlife, and recreation. Its waterways also face a variety of threats – from day-to-day challenges such as polluted runoff and industrial waste, to rare but catastrophic events such as oil spills.

Why the Trump administration’s latest high-profile environmental rollback is wrong

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Kelsey Lamp
Protect Our Oceans, Advocate

In the lifespan of the black coral, which can live for 500 years or more, two years is nothing. Yet, for the black coral that live 150 miles to the Southeast of Cape Cod, these last two years have been monumental--that is, they have marked the first years in which the black coral have enjoyed full protections from then-President Obama’s designation of the Northeast Canyons and Seamounts Marine National Monument.

Many of fracking’s worst impacts — from air pollution and water contamination to health problems — are felt by nearby communities. That’s why municipalities across the country are taking a stand.

 | by
John Rumpler
Senior Director, Clean Water for America Campaign and Senior Attorney

Why do we need federal protection under the Clean Water Act if there are also state laws designed to protect our rivers and streams? The answer is that, all too often, state officials fail to enforce their own laws or side with politically-powerful polluters.

We all want our teeth to be clean after brushing, and our bodies to be clean after showering, but did you know the products used in these everyday activities could be harming wildlife? Hundreds of commonly-used household products contain tiny plastic microbeads, which can be a big problem for our environment. 

Halloween is the annual time to celebrate all the creepy things that go bump in the night, but what's really fightening are the many very real threats to our waterways and drinking water. Nothing is more important to life than clean water, yet few things are taken more for granted. We turn on our taps or swim in a local lake without fear because we believe the systems are working to keep our water clean. The fact is, those systems don’t always work, and in many cases, are failing to keep water safe. 

For Margo Pellegrino — who recently completed a 1,700 mile journey from New York to Chicago in an outrigger canoe — advocating for clean water can be like “paddling against the wind on a windy day.” Now that she’s back home in Medford Lakes, N.J., she’s not slowed down any in her quest to protect our waterways and ensure clean water for all Americans. 

Last year at this time, the toxic algae bloom in Lake Erie caused nearly half a million people in and around Toledo, Ohio, to be without safe drinking water. Clean water from our taps is something that many of us take for granted, but if we don’t protect our water sources — like the residents of Toledo discovered — we won’t be able to take it for granted anymore.

On Tuesday, the Obama administration announced a commitment to nearly triple wind power, solar power, and other non-hydro renewable sources in the U.S., so that they make up 20 percent of our energy use by 2030.